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Crochet Hooks – My Complete Guide To All The Different Types & Styles

Apart from yarn, crochet hooks are an essential tool for doing this beloved craft. One without the other, and it’s not complete. Just like if there wasn’t the ying to balance out the yang! 

To become a crocheter, one of the most important things is knowing and understanding your tools.

This post is to help you understand everything you need to know about crochet hooks.

Learn about the different types, what they’re made from, the different parts of a crochet hook, and much more helpful information.

Table Of Contents

For those who love color as they crochet

Why Are Crochet Hooks So Important?

Without crochet hooks, well, it wouldn’t be crochet. They’re a unique tool, unlike any others used for fiber arts or yarn crafts.

The reason crochet hooks are shaped the way they are is so the crochet can grasp the knots quickly and get into already created stitches without breaking the yarn. Needles and other tools can’t do that.

Crochet Hook Anatomy

A crochet hook may appear quite simple. A stick with a hook, that’s it.

Knowing the anatomy of this equipment will help you choose the most comfortable style.

There is the body and the head. The body is divided into three parts, a handle, a shaft, and a throat. Some hooks have a thumb rest. The head is divided into a point, a groove, and a lip.

Here is a breakdown of each part.

The Handle

This is the bit that rests in your palm if you have a knife-grip. If you have a pencil grip, it rests against your index finger. Sometimes, the handle is made from the same material as the shaft. Others, it’s different.

Sometimes, the handle has a thumb rest, which is either the same size as the shaft or bigger.

The Thumb Rest (Not All Have One)

It’s the area on the hook where you rest your thumb, hence the name.

Mostly, models with one are more comfortable, but it’s up to you which one suits you best.

The Shaft

The area between the handle and the head. The length of the shaft determines what kind of stitches you can create.

A stitch like bullion or clusters stitch requires a lot of ‘loading,’ many loops bunched together. These, and longer ones, like cluster stitches, need a long shaft.

Check the length of the shaft, and consider which stitches you do most to make a decision.

The Throat

Tapered ones have tapered throats. It’s thinner than the shaft in all dimensions.

Inline ones have a throat the same width as the shaft.

They both have a different feel. Try out both and see what you think.

The Head

The head is three parts, the tip, the groove, and the lip.

The tip or the point is right at the end of the hook. They can be curved or rounded to very pointy. The easiest to use is semi-blunt or semi-rounded.

If it’s too blunt, it’s hard to get into stitches. If it’s too sharp, it could split your yarn, or even worse, no one wants yarn that snags though sharp ends are excellent for something such as adding borders.

The groove holds the yarn stitches you’re working on. They’re either straight or rounded and function better or worse for different people

The lip is where the crochet hook gets its name. It’s the actual hook on end.

The shape of all these depends on whether the instrument is inline/bates or tapered/boye.

If it’s inline, the head is round, but the same size as the shaft. The lip overhangs the shaft. The groove is deep and has a steep incline inwards.

If it’s tapered, the head is oval-shaped, the lip overhangs from the shaft. The grooves are smaller than inline ones.

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What Are Crochet Hooks Made Of?

The most common ones are made of aluminum, but they’re also made of plastic, bamboo, and steel. Other, more luxury versions can be made of different woods, clay, glass, and other materials.

Crochet Hook Styles

There are two types, inline/bates, and tapered/boye. Here are the differences between each.

Tapered

This type gets its name from the shape of the throat. It’s tiny compared to the rest of the hook. The hook heads have a smooth finish and are curved.

If you have loose tension and need to crochet something a bit tighter, a tapered hook is the perfect thing to help. The narrow shape of the throat helps keep the tension tight.

Inline

The throat of these hooks is the same diameter or ‘inline’ as the rest of the hook.

They tend to be quite comfortable and easy to use, the right choice for beginner crocheters.

Regardless of what you decide, try both to determine what hook shape is best for you.

Both of these types can come with something called a round grip, designed for people whose crochet hooks roll when they’re working.

There’s no thumb rest, and the whole hook is the same thickness, from top to bottom.

There’s also a rubber grip, which is more like a standard grip, but it has soft rubber to make it easy to use.

What Are The Different Types Of Crochet Hooks?

There are a few different types, here is a breakdown of each class, their purpose, and whom they’re best suited for.

Aluminum Crochet Hooks

These are the staple type, the most common and widely used. Suited for regular crochet, and this is the perfect choice for beginners. They’re also known as basic crochet hooks.

They come in a wide variety of sizes and are suited to almost any type of project. 

(Note: If you don’t like the feel or look of the aluminum, then you can also get normal ones made out of bamboo or plastic. The choice is up to you.)

Bamboo crochet hooks are light, affordable, and made of smooth, renewable material.

Plastic crochet hooks are light, hollow, and comfortable to hold. They’re especially useful for extreme crochet or when you’re crocheting something bulky like a blanket because it won’t be so much of a strain on the wrists.

Ergonomic Crochet Hooks

The word ergonomic means designed for performance, ease of use, and comfort in the engineering and manufacturing process of a product.

Ergonomic products are designed to be safe and comfortable to be used for longer periods.

Put the word in front of crochet hooks, and this is a special type of crochet hook designed for those with wrist pain, arthritis, carpal tunnel syndrome, tendonitis, or stress injuries.

They have quite a different handle to normal models, they’re much larger and a different shape, so keep this in mind if you’re considering one.

They come in every size you’d expect of normal models.

For more information on the best ergonomic crochet hooks, read my guide and review here.

Knook Crochet Hooks

Did you know it’s possible to create a crocheted fabric that looks like knitting? With this unique type of crochet hook, you can do just that. It’s called a knook.

It looks very similar to a normal version, but it’s usually a bit longer and has a small hole drilled in one end.

You use this hole to thread a separate piece of cord through to hold the crochet stitches as you crochet. 

Light Up Crochet Hooks

These are almost the same as regular versions, but they have a special and very helpful feature.

If you have trouble seeing your crochet in low light or want to watch tv without the light overhead, this crochet hook is the perfect solution.

Designed for situations like these, these light up or glow in the dark! The light is concentrated around the hook end of the tool so you can see your working stitch and others you’re putting the hook into.

Steel Crochet Hooks

These may look similar to your average version but just made of steel and a little bit smaller than other sizes available. But there’s a reason for them being so small. 

They’re designed for lace crochet and making super fine designs or patterns like tablecloths or dollies. Their size enables them to create beautiful, delicate, and intricate stitches.

They’re also made from steel so they’re easy to grip and so they don’t slip when you’re working with them.

Thread Crochet Hooks

These are similar to normal ones, but they’re small and thin for crocheting with crochet thread. The sizing is slightly different too.

Tunisian Crochet Hooks

Tunisian crochet is a unique type of crochet, using an entirely different library of stitches as opposed to normal crochet. So it makes sense they have a specialized tool to complete the craft.

Tunisian crochet hooks are also known as cro hooks or afghan crochet hooks.

They look like long versions of normal crochet hooks, and they either have a hook at both ends of the stick or a cable connecting to ends, both with a hook on each end.

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What Sizes Do Crochet Hooks Come In?

There is four main sizing system for the sizes of crochet hooks. These are metric sizing, US sizes, UK Sizes, and steel crochet hook sizes. 

Read my post on crochet hooks sizes here. It includes everything you need to know, the difference between the sizing systems, and helpful conversion tables.

What Are The Best Crochet Hooks?

It depends on which material feels comfortable in your hands, your skill level, whether you prefer ergonomic crochet hooks, and which type of crochet you’re doing.

It’s hard to know which crochet hook to choose. There are so many different types and styles to choose from. As you can see from what’s mentioned in this post.

To discover which crochet hook is right for you, read my post on The Best Crochet Hooks here.

Crochet Hooks – Your Questions Answered

Are Wooden Crochet Hooks Better?

If you’re going for something smooth, lighter in weight but not too light, and with a good grip, then yes, wooden crochet hooks are better suited for you.

Does Walmart Have Crochet Hooks?

Yes, they do sell crochet hooks in their crafts section, but make sure you check your store of choice stocks them.

Why Is The End Of A Crochet Hook Pointed?

Because it enables you to get into the already crocheted fabric and create more stitches easily, without snagging the yarn or making it difficult to crochet the next stitch.

What Crochet Hook Is Best For Beginners?

Alimumim crochet hooks. They’re excellent because they’re affordable, readily available, and available in a wide range of sizes and for many different usages.

Can You Crochet Without A Hook?

Yes, there is such a thing as finger crochet, where you use your fingers in place of a hook.

What Are Crochet Sticks Called?

They’re called crochet sticks, crochet hooks, hooks for crochet, crocheting hooks, and crochet needles.

There you have it, a dip into the essential knowledge of the wonderful tool that allows us to do this excellent hobby. 

Did you learn something, or is there something you know that should be included in the post? Let me know in the comments so I can help others with their journey in learning about crochet. 

Something I forgot? Or have a question? Get in touch with me here or message me on Twitter.

About Jodie Morgan

Hi. I’m Jodie Morgan, owner and creator of Crochet Penguin. (Yes, I’m a real person :) )

Thanks for being here. I created Crochet Penguin to help show 1,000,000 people the benefits of crochet & highlight alternatives to fast fashion.

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