How To Clean Your Crochet Hooks: A Quick Guide To Easy Maintenance

Crochet hooks, with frequent use, can become grimy or tarnished. Don’t worry, cleaning your crochet hooks is easier than you think! I’ll share some quick and effective tips to keep them in top condition.

Different material Crochet Hooks and how to clean steel, wooden, aluminum, plastic, resin hooks

Table Of Contents

How Do You Clean Clean Your Crochet Hooks?

Here are the cleaning instructions for different hook materials. Whether you have aluminum, acrylic, plastic, steel, wooden or bamboo hooks, these tips will keep your hooks well maintained.

How To Clean Acrylic/Resin Crochet Hooks?

To clean acrylic or resin crochet hooks, wash them in warm water and a mild detergent, and dry before storing.

How To Clean Aluminum Crochet Hooks?

To clean Aluminum crochet hooks, wash them in warm water and a mild detergent, and dry before storing. Don’t clean aluminum hooks with metal polish because of the coating which applies to the hooks. This could be rubbed off during the cleaning process.

How To Clean Bamboo Crochet Hooks?

To clean bamboo crochet hooks, do so with a damp cloth and dry. Buff with beeswax to protect the wood.

How to Clean Plastic Crochet Hooks?

To clean plastic hooks, wash them in warm water and a mild detergent, and dry before storing.

How To Clean Steel Crochet Hooks?

To clean the steel hooks, use a standard metal polish. Work it well over the hook and rub it off with a soft cloth. If the hooks are old, you may need to repeat this to remove all the dirt. Be careful cleaning very fine hooks, as these may bend or become caught in the polishing cloth.

If there are small patches of rust on the steel crochet hook, rub away the rust with fine sandpaper or glass paper until you see bright metal. Don’t overdo this or you’ll wear it away.

To prevent the needles from rusting or tarnishing, polish the crochet hooks with a wax-based furniture polish (spray furniture polish works as well as solid wax) or beeswax. Clean off excess wax/polish with a soft cloth. You’ll notice the needles become shinier.

Clean off the excess wax/polish before using the hooks or this will transfer to your hands.

You can also soak steel chooks in rubbing alcohol and dry with a soft cloth before storing.

How To Clean Wooden Crochet Hooks

To clean wooden crochet hooks, use oil for woods (don’t use water) and buff with beeswax to protect the wood.

Here’s a video by Maker 37 on YouTube about maintaining your wooden hooks.

FAQs – How To Clean Your Crochet Hook

Should I Wash My Crochet Hook?

Yes, you should wash your crochet hook if it’s getting sticky or dirty. Give the crochet hook a gentle wash in warm soapy water to bring back its smooth glide. However, if your crochet hook is made of steel, aluminum, bamboo or wood, don’t wash them!

Why Do Crochet Hooks Get Sticky?

Crochet hooks get sticky because of the oil and sweat on your fingers, and heat generated from rubbing against the yarn constantly.

How Do You Get Sticky Residue Off Crochet Hooks?

You get sticky residue off crochet hooks by washing them gently with soapy water, or polishing.

Here’s an excellent short video by Conquer Crochet on YouTube.

How Do You Make Crochet Hooks Less Squeaky?

You make crochet hooks less squeaky by cleaning them with polish or wax.

How Do You Make A Crochet Hook Slide Better?

You make crochet hooks slide better by cleaning them with polish or wax.

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Conclusion

With these simple and effective cleaning methods, you’ll enjoy smooth and hassle-free crochet sessions. So put the above methods to the test, and see the difference! If you have questions, please tell me below. I’d be happy to help.

About The Author

Jodie Morgan From Crochet Penguin

Jodie Morgan (Author & Founder)

[email protected] | Lives In: Chiang Mai, Thailand

Author: Jodie Morgan is a passionate crocheter and blogger with 17+ years of experience currently living in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Taught by her mother, she fell in love with crocheting after her first child was born. When she’s not crocheting, you’ll find her enjoying a cup of coffee with cream, or sharing helpful resources and tips with the online crochet community. Please say hello, or see what she's making on socials.

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